Articles

Topic: Content Strategy

Content Integration

June 27, 1999

Web services often collect content from separate sources and present it to users in a single interface. Making such integration usable requires unified meta-content.

Web Pages Must Live Forever

November 29, 1998

Keeping old content alive will more than double the value of a site and only cost a small investment in content gardening. Removed pages equal lost users.

Fighting Linkrot

June 14, 1998

6% of the Web's links are broken, diminishing its usability. All old URLs should be kept working indefinitely - otherwise you throw away business.

The Case For Micropayments

January 25, 1998

Micropayments prevent annoying Web ads and encourage site-design for users' needs. Subscription fees discourage new users, search engines, and links.

The Web in 1998: Some Predictions

January 1, 1998

The Web will become more international (but will overseas sites or American sites benefit?), sites will outsource services, content will adapt to usage patterns in real time.

Slate Magazine - An Early Review

August 16, 1996

Slate fails due to its inability to adjust to the online medium: too long articles, too little hypertext, scrolling home page (though redesigns have improved later issues)

In Defense of Print

February 1, 1996

Paper remains the optimal medium for some forms of writing, especially for long works like a book. It is an unfortunate fact that current computer screens lead to a reading speed that is approximately 25% slower than reading from paper. We have invented better screens and it is just a matter of time before reading from computers is as good as reading from paper, but for the time being we have to design our information for the actual screens in use around the world.

Directions for Online Publishing

August 1, 1995

Online publishing of newspapers, magazines, and books is really a meaningless concept. We have to leave the legacy publications behind as we invent the world of online publishing. Information will have to be organized in new ways that match the properties of the new medium rather than being derived from the way the physical limitations of the old medium caused information to be split up among specific publications.

Previous «  1   2  » Next